Follow on Facebook Facebook 
Follow on Twitter   Twitter

L’Opera Minora

ISBN 2-85446-284-X, 03/00, limited edition, hors commerce

Collections “Planètes”

English

A radical work of art and literary construction that orchestrates the discourses of photographic and alphabetical writings (English, French and Persian) into a coherent new form. A circuitry of tensions, dialogues, correspondences that explores the limits of the literary artifact, the book object and the reading phenomenon. A Book of Writings, of graphisms and of traces. A critical engagement with the discourse of anthropology, travel writing and journalism. An epic in shards and a poetic meditation on migration and displacement. A book of ruptures and metamorphoses, a tapestry of knotgraphs and driftworks. A theory of writing in the context of a contact with the Other.

Français

Oeuvre qui orchestre les discours des langues alphabétiques (anglais, français, persan) et de l’image en une cohérence propre à chacun d’eux et dans une mise en réseaux de tensions, dialogues, correspondences. La photographie, écriture de la lumière, n’est pas une illustration des textes; elle développe les ressources de son propre langage: enjeu entre la présence et l’absence. Les textes, écriture de la machine, écriture du sang de la main sont là, à côté de l’image, comme témoignage d’une recherche de la pratique de la trace. Epopée en fragments, terres du bout du monde: le Finistère et Lorient; L’Orient, terre de la naissance; Saint-Domingue, terre des passages; New York, terre du présent: Tout accentue le mystère de la laison entre ces lieux. Odyssée du corps dans l’espace, du souffle qui dit l’esprit. Ouvrage critique des récits de voyage, des rapports ethnographiques, L’opera minora se veut un traité de l’écriture de l’Autre.

“A masterpiece… Multilingual to the bone, intimate with the cultures, the idioms and the intricacies of his many worlds, Amir Parsa is an extraordinary writer and artist of marvelous range and depth…”

—Peter J. Awn, professor of Comparative Religion and author, Satan’s Tragedy and Redemption

“Magnifique… renouvelle profondément la tradition de la rencontre poétique avec l’Autre.”

—Professeur Dominique Jullien, auteur, Proust et ses modèles,et Récits du nouveau monde: les voyageurs français en Amérique de Chateaubriand à nos jours

Excerpt

It was on my regular Sunday morning stroll through the open-air market by the great place commemorating the grand revolution that a revelation, which I thought, upon further reflection, should have struck me earlier, so obvious it seemed, finally dawned upon, in a most banal manner I admit, on a most common day, in a most common setting. There I was, walking by the displays of the fruit vendors and the vegetable vendors and the fish vendors and the good Samaritans bringing in their farm-fresh products that a most conspicuous noise began ringing in my ear, an echo of sufferings past, if I may, the strange and almost unbearable cacophony of pointless voices filling the air. All manners of hollerings, shrieks and cries, from the come on pass the ball pass the ball here here here of the teammates on sports units of youth to the badgering by one teacher of another of why didn’t you do the work now were you not told to do such and such work for today were you not, to the scolding of one angry parent or another, the tempestuous guilt-inducing threats of I can’t take this anymore you’ll see I’m disappearing soon I’m divorcing you and getting out of here and saving my self whoever said to go through this, flooded my mind — my entire body, to be more exact, for I sensed the pointless extravagance of each of the crescendos in my veins, each of the skin-scratching screeches of girlfriend pulling hair beating chest popping out veins and threatening suicide, each of the delirious insistences of one professor or another expounding passionately one theory or another, berating rivals in the process and digressing even at times into high-pitched if admittedly amusing anecdotes: felt, yes, heard again, as if pounding on my bones, as if circulating like a crazed suicidal motorist, through my arteries, as if crazily batting arms and legs laughingly against the liquidy essence of my inner labyrinth, as if popping vintage venom into my hapless cells, the ageless blabber of prophets and guides atop scaffolds, atop roofs, atop towers and platforms built for the occasions, self-appointed guides and mercenaries, figures with robes or decorations, swinging up arms and swinging them down, their frowns and their ludicrous postures one with the ridiculous open and close of their wisdom-spewing labial parts, their hollers, their calls, their chants.

The fervor of my agitation grew as I walked through the tight alleys formed by the various set-ups. On the left and on the right, the rush of bodies, the squeezing, the heightening paranoia, the increasing angst. I was by now little intrigued by the actual products displayed in my vicinity, fully impervious to the offerings, drowned, fully, in my own seemingly bottomless anguish. I could barely comprehend why, why now especially, I had been here after all, I had passed by these parts before, every week in fact, I had heard the same noises, I had seen and felt the same movements, the same tight spaces. Were my own private frustrations expounding such delusions, my own grievances inducing the inward spiral that was prompting these hallucinatory flashbacks, these almost unreal memories, this osmosis of past shrieks from all walks of life, this grand fireball of cacophony? Sibezamini piaze, I heard, somewhere in the caverns of my being, I hendooneh I hendooneh, come and get it come and get it, free tickets, free tickets, sibezamini piaze, sibezamini piaze!

Nothing could stop the flow: I tried, I sat for a few instants, I attempted even, to strike a conversation with one mightily sexily clad raven: but all for naught, all for naught: I could not even deliver a fragment of a sentence, could not articulate, could not put three words together: crushed by my incapacity to deliver, crushed by the sheer mass of propositions belted out in the air: allez cinq francs la caisse allez ohoh cinq francs la caisse, dix francs la piece dix francs la pasteque allez allez dix francs la pasteque, dix francs seulement, dix francs, dix francs la pasteque.

What to do, where to turn. Although I had chosen through my own volition to venture in these parts, it seemed impossible to turn around now, enclosed, on both sides, by the crowds, and all round, pathetically, by the noise and the calls, a fantastical wall erected without the slightest shame. No choice but to walk, to bear it, to stand it, allez les bons melons, extra extra allez les bons melons. Ignore it, I prodded myself, or at least, put a brake on the imagination. Don’t let this induce that, don’t let one calamity awaken the memories of another. Don’t let one shriek, I thought, don’t let one chant, light another, all the others, all. Don’t, I thought, try, but I could not, could not, I do not know what it was, on this day, this occasion, what it was, don’t, but I could not. Quinze francs seulement le plateau d’abricots la quinze francs seulement.

No use, I concluded, but why, why. Un kilo dix francs allons-y allons-y allez dix melons vingt-cinq dix melon allez hop-la dix melons vingt-cinq: why, on this day, did the incessant hollering and coercing and coaxing of the merchants, the fruit merchants especially (say it as it is!), entice this overbearing remembrance: of all shrieks, of all calls and chants: from the inanity of the politicians, to the companions of youth, the drone of supervisors, teachers and profs, the paltry servings of the rents, the cataclysmic versions of every friend and foe who ever dared raise the voice: dix francs la piece dix francs la piece allez-y allez-y allez-y allez quinze a quinze a quinze a quinze francs dix, allez deux kilos dix francs la tomate francaise la profitez la deux kilos dix la tomate francaise. Why.

And I turned around and I saw the monument with its angel hovering above. And I turned my wrist and checked the watch, and the date. Yes indeed, blissful clarity, now I knew, now I knew. Illumination at last, no doubt about it: here I was, here, yes, but peering from afar at the angel of revolution, on this the twelfth day of the second month of the holy calendar, after the first day of the new year so many years after the death of Jesus of Nazareth…

I turned and jumped on a bench. The entire crowd, in all the alleys, in all the lanes, in all the tight spaces suddenly came to a halt and turned to me. The merchants all, suddenly, had ceased the hollering. No one moved, no one dared, not a single word, not even a whisper, or a breath. They had all turned to me, like mummies, like marionettes, silent, expectant.

I brought my hands to my head and pulled like a madman, my hair. My face contorted, I let out my final salutation, my one command, O how I had been longing to all day, and O how my echoes carried, I let out my own unseemly cry: once upon a time, and long ago it was, stop screaming I hollered aloud, STOP SCREAMING…

I had prolonged the vowels (added precision), I had let out the doubt, O the liberation, I hollered again, and again, and again, stop screeeeeeeeaaaaaaamiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggg…

***

– Pas d’histoires, pas de fable, aucune intrigue…

– …

– Aucun entretien, pas de recherches, aucune lecture!

– …

– Ton voyage a Lorient!…

– …

– Ni roman, ni chronique, ni portrait… Ni poème, ni enquête, ni méditation… Ni, ni, ni!…

– …

– Tu n’as rien connu à Lorient… Tu ne le connais pas Lorient… Loin de tes rêves… Lorient… Loin…

– …

– Tu as tout inventé… Tout inventé à Lorient… Tout inventé!

– …

– Tu n’as rien vu à Lorient… Tu ne les as pas connus… Tu n’as rien…

– ….

– Tout inventé!… Que des mensonges!…

– …

– Lorient de tes songes!… Lorient des rêves!…

– …

– Lorient n’existe pas!… Tu as tout inventé à Lorient… Des mensonges, des jeux… Tout inventé à Lorient!… Lorient n’existe pas…

– …

– Tu n’as pas atterri à Lorient par hasard… Tu n’aurais pu atterrir à Lorient par hasard… Tu mens… Tu n’aurais pu…

– …

– Dis-moi la vérité… Tu n’aurais pu… la vérité…

– …

– Lorient n’existe pas… C’est pas vrai… Dis le moi… Lorient n’existe pas…

– …

– …

– C’est vrai… Par hasard… J’ai inventé… C’est vrai…

– …

– Je n’ai rien vu à Lorient… Je… C’est vrai… Tout inventé… Lorient n’existe pas…

– …

– Je n’ai rien entendu, rien dis à Lorient… Rien fait à Lorient… Rien… C’est vrai…

– …

– Je n’ai pas marché dans les rues de Lorient la nuit, je n’ai pas longé le quai, la nuit, le bruit de mes pas… la nuit… C’est vrai…

– …

– Je n’ai pas raté le port de pêche le matin… C’est vrai… Je n’ai rien vu, je ne les ai pas vu… Je n’ai pas vu au loin la citadelle, je ne suis pas rentré seul, solitaire dans le bar, au bar du port, je n’étais pas assis, les voiliers, les bateaux, les marins, je ne les ai pas vus à Lorient… C’est vrai…

– …

– Je n’ai pas longé le quai à Lorient, je n’ai pas connu H___, le Seigneur ne m’a pas accosté dans le bar, saoûl, je n’ai pas marché à Lorient la nuit…

– …

– Je n’ai pas marché dans la rue de Lorient, à l’aube, je n’ai pas… C’est vrai… Je n’ai rien connu… Je n’ai pas vu la citadelle, pas de port, pas de pêcheur, je ne les ai pas connus… Ils ne m’ont rien dit, ils n’ont rien, ils ne m’ont pas abordé…

– …

– La folle sur le quai ne se parlait pas, je ne marchais pas la nuit à Lorient, le bruit de mes pas, Yves ne m’a pas dit Ah chui pas si bête que ça moi… C’est vrai… Il n’a pas… H___ n’a pas dit les cailloux, il ne l’a pas… C’est vrai… C’est vrai…

– …

– On ne peut pas perdre le feu il ne l’a pas dit… C’est vrai… je n’ai pas connu le Roi… et le marin pêcheur de Port-Louis et son Oh c’est pour passer le temps si je reste à la maison je m’endors dans le fauteuil, je ne l’ai pas entendu…

– …

– C’est vrai… C’est vrai… Lorient n’existe pas… A___ n’est pas une voleuse, L___ n’est pas capitaine, le Roi n’a pas dit que les poissons ne baisaient pas plus vite que le filet…

– …

– Le Café du Port n’existe pas, le Charleston n’existe pas, A___ n’existe pas, la Rue du Bout du Monde n’existe pas, le port de pêche… n’existe pas…

– …

– M___ n’est pas rentré dans le bar du port, il n’a pas levé les bras, il n’a pas crié Tonton Marco est là, il ne l’a pas fait… Yves le clochard marin pêcheur savant errant et toujours ivre ne m’a pas regardé d’un air stupéfait, interrogatoire, quand je lui ai demandé ce qu’il faisait ici s’il était de Pont-Aven: le ‘qu’est-ce que tu fais ici alors,’ je ne l’ai pas dis, il n’est pas resté comme ça, figé, insoucieux… C’est vrai… Lorient n’existe pas…

– …

– Le son de mes pas la nuit… Les baguettes… Les amoureux du quai… Alexandre et son copain… (je n’ai pas marché la nuit… je n’ai pas… pas la citadelle… le son de mes… C’est vrai… C’est vrai…

– …

– Lorient n’existe pas…

– …

– Lorient n’existe pas…

– …

– Les enfants ne tournaient pas devant le manège de Bambino… La musique ne continuait pas chez Bambino les enfant partis… Le chien de café ne dormait pas… jamais… C’est vrai…

– …

– Il n’y a pas eu de guerre à Lorient, pas de bombardements, les soldats n’occupaient pas Lorient… Lorient n’a pas été détruite à quatre-vingt dix pourcent… C’est vrai…

– …

– C___ ne t’a pas attendu… pour quitter Lorient… C’est vrai… Je mens… C’est vrai… Les passants… qui allaient être ici encore demain… demain… quand je n’y serai plus… ici… où je ne reviendrai plus… leurs expressions familières… quotidiennes… du jour le jour… Ils ne sont pas passés… Ils ne m’ont pas côtoyés… Ils ne sont pas passés à côté… ils ne m’ont pas frôlé… Ils n’y étaient pas… Personne à Lorient… Je n’avais pas besoin d’eux… Je ne les ai pas quittés… H___ n’a pas dit qu’ici les gens leur train train… Ce qui les intéresse c’est leur train train… Il ne l’a pas dit… C’est vrai… Je mens… C’est vrai… C___ ne m’a pas attendu pour quitter… C___ ne m’attend pas pour quitter… C’est vrai… Lorient n’existe pas…

– …

– Les vingt derniers francs, tu ne les as pas payés au Charleston (pour le café et le jus d’orange!…), les visages souriants, les magazines du bureau de tabac, tu ne les as pas vus, tu n’as pas passé le magasin de photos, le couple qui se disputait, la rue Victor Massé, tu ne l’as pas passée, tu ne t’es pas arrêté pour écrire… ça… C’est vrai… La voiture n’a pas dérapé, elle n’a pas tourné, la moto, les passants, la vieille dame, le bistrot vide, ta marche, le passage piéton, le ‘putain de priorité’ (C___), les tee-shirts dehors, le Pub, la Gallery, la porte, l’hôtel, tu ne l’as pas… C’est vrai… C’est vrai…

– …

– Lorient n’existe pas…

– …

– Lorient n’existe pas…

– …

– Lorient, n’existe pas.

( – Quand tu es sorti de la gare, tu as regardé, à gauche, à droite, regardé encore, tu ne savais où aller, tu ne connaissais pas, tu ne savais pas, pourquoi tu étais là, par où aller, quelle direction, tu ne savais pas où tu étais, tu ne connaissais personne, rien, ni la ville, ni son port, ni ses personnages, ni ses cafés ou ses terrasses, ses histoires, son histoire. Tu ne les connaissais pas…

Tu es sorti de la gare, tu as longé le grand boulevard, lentement, tu marchais, sur le trottoir, tes sacs, tu étais ni voyageur ni visiteur ni touriste, ni citoyen… Tu étais de passage, et tu n’allais pas rester…

Tu as connu à Lorient Yves, H___, A___, L___ Lord, les dames du port de pêche, A___ au Charleston, les habitués du Bar du Port, el Ray, le cuistot inventeur de proverbes…

Le port les voiliers, les grand vaisseaux, les nuits de Lorient, les hommes à baguette ou les cyclistes sur les ponts, tu ne les connaissais pas, tu n’en savais rien…

Que pendant la guerre, tout a été… Ça non plus…

Tu n’attendais rien, tu ne voulais rien. Tu ne voulais pas voir des chevaux roses, des tapis volants, tu n’en voulais point des parfums exotiques, du rhum, des extases mythiques et de l’encens illusoire. Tu n’avais rien lu, personne ne t’en avait parlé (sauf le garçon de café, la nuit avant ton départ, à Paris), tu n’avais rien demandé. Tu es arrivé par hasard à Lorient,

par hasard à Lorient, Lorient de tes glas… Lorient de tes songes…,

tu marchais sur le trottoir du grand boulevard… seul, tu marchais vers le port, vers la mer, vers l’eau,

tu ne connaissais pas Lorient…

mais tu as tout vu à Lorient… Tu as connu Lorient… Tu l’as connu… Ses visages, ses personnages, ses moments, ses ports… Tu as connu Lorient… Tu étais à Lorient… Tu as vécu à Lorient… et Lorient,

tu le quitteras…

Lorient existe: tu es passé, t’y as vécu, tu l’as vu… Tu l’as vu, tu l’as parcouru, le bruit de tes pas la nuit à Lorient, l’ombre des vélos sur les ponts, la fatigue des pêcheurs, le désarroi, à Lorient, et leurs bonheurs, et leurs doutes…

Tu es passé à Lorient. Tu l’as vu, tu l’as connu… Lorient existe…

Lorient existe… Tu l’as connu, t’y as vécu, tu étais de passage, à Lorient,

( – L’apostrophe, déplacé, doublement, dévoile:

l’Autre:

– …

– Lorient n’existe pas,

Lorient n’existe pas,

Lorient,

cover_opera_minora